52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #26 – Jacob H. Repsher

Relationship: 3rd Great-grandfather
Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 2.27.51 PM


My childhood home was on Merriam Avenue which is in Newton, Sussex County, New Jersey, and was named for Henry W. Merriam. Mr. Merriam built a large shoe factory that he owned from 1873 until his death in 1900. At the height of its production, thousands of pairs of shoes a week rolled off the factory floors.[1] This factory was a far cry from the old world art of hand-crafting shoes and it made Mr. Merriam very wealthy. His gorgeous private residence still stands at 131 Main Street. My childhood home was not quite so grand!

Many years later, after the street had been named for him and Mr. Merriam was long gone, there was a humble shoemaker named Charley Williams. He lived on Merriam Avenue, the next block over from our house, just a short distance past Pine Street. He ran his shoe repair business out of his home. Back then, things weren’t as disposable as they are now. If your shoes needed new heels, you dropped them off to have the heels replaced. Occasionally, my mom would take my two sisters and me to his house to drop off shoes for him to fix. When you walked into what should have been his closed-in front porch, you were instantly surrounded by soles, forms, punches, stretchers, uppers, hammers, and heels. There were all manner of things hanging from the ceiling beams by hooks. Inhaling brought the warm scent of leather and polish deep into your nose. Abandoned shoes lounged on the window sills waiting for someone to claim them; gathering dust they longer they sat. No space was left unfilled.

What I didn’t know then was that I was probably looking at the very same things that my 3rd great-grandfather, Jacob H. Repsher, used in his own shoemaking shop in Bartonsville, Monroe County, Pennsylvania. Until I began my genealogy research I had no idea I would  discover a shoemaker hiding in my family tree.

Born to parents John Joseph Repsher and Polly [Mary] Doll, Jacob Henry Repsher arrived on this earth on 20 May 1831 in Pocono Township, Monroe County, Pennsylvania,[2] with no shoemaking skills whatsoever. I’m sure, though, one of his first occupations involved teasing his many siblings. Jacob was the second child of eleven children born to John Joseph and Polly:[3]

  1. Catherine Repsher, born 15 December 1829
  2. Jacob H. Repsher, born 20 May 1831
  3. John Joseph Repsher, born April 1833
  4. Andrew Repsher, born 1834-1836
  5. Mary Repsher, born about 1837
  6. Joseph D. Repsher, born about 1839
  7. Simon Paul Repsher, born about 1841
  8. Michael Repsher, born 03 October 1843
  9. William Repsher, born about 1845
  10. Leonard Repsher, born about 1847
  11. Priscilla Repsher, born about 1849

When Jacob was 19 years old, he was still living in his parent’s household.[4] His occupation at this time was simply listed as laborer as was his 17-year-old brother John. Since Jacob’s father was listed as a farmer, it would be safe to assume that the two oldest boys were helping with the daily tasks involved with running a farm.

Shortly after the taking of the 1850 U.S. census, he met and married Susanna Williams. They were married on 11 December 1851 by the Justice of the Peace, Jno. D. Frailey in Jackson Township, Monroe County, Pennsylvania.[5]

Between December 1851 and 20 July 1860 when the U.S. census was taken, Jacob and Susanna had five children. They were living in Pocono Township. Their household consisted of Jacob (29), Susanna (26), Emmanel (7), John (6), Jacob H. (5), Aaron J. (4), and Samuel P. (3).[6] It would seem that Jacob was a shoemaker by now but the occupation listed is a tough one to read. One can barely make out Susanna’s occupation as servant and the enumerator’s handwriting leaves a lot to be desired.Screen Shot 2015-06-25 at 7.15.04 PM

There seems to be a letter (M, perhaps?) before the occupation. It could be that Jacob was listed a cordwainer which is another name for shoemaker. But I am grasping at straws, just trying to decipher the handwriting. There was a “miller” (as an occupation, not a name) listed below on the same page along with the same mysterious letter in front of it.

Screen Shot 2015-06-26 at 6.54.21 AM

Jacob Repsher at his shop in Bartonsville.

This is a good spot to explain a little bit about the different types of professions involved with footwear. Shoemakers may produce a variety of items including shoes, boots, sandals, clogs, and moccasins.[7] A cordwainer specializes in making fine, soft leather shoes or other luxury leather footwear. The name is derived from the fine Cordovan leather produced in Spain.[8] Cobblers, in contrast, are shoemakers who specialize in the repair of shoes rather than the making of shoes.[9]

Whatever Jacob’s profession at this time, it had to be put on hold. The Late War of the Rebellion broke out and Jacob was drafted and served as a private on the side of the Union. According to his sworn affidavit, Jacob said he was drafted into the army in the fall of 1862. He and other draftees traveled to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where they remained for 10 days. At that time he said he contracted typhoid fever and thus returned home to Bartonsville to recover, about one year. When he returned to serve out his term he was stationed at Philadelphia where he did provost duty about the Schuylkill arsenal.  On 20 May 1863, Jacob was sent to Chattanooga, Tennessee. At that time, he was put into active service in Company I of the 147th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry. He participated in Sherman’s march from Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Atlanta, Georgia. It was in Atlanta, Georgia, that Jacob was discharged from service on 09 September 1864.[10]

Jacob made his way back to his family in Pennsylvania and settled in to practice his trade of shoemaking. He also expanded his family. In the 1870 U.S. census, Jacob (39) and Susanna (34) were found with children Emmanuel (17), John (16), Aaron (12), Samuel (10), Frederic (7), Firman (5), Josiah (3), and Armin (1) living in Pocono, Monroe County, Pennsylvania.[11] This time, Jacob’s profession was easily readable. He was a shoemaker with $800 in real estate and $300 in personal property. The real estate that Jacob owned in 1870 consisted of a lot of land about one acre in Bartonsville with an old house and a shoemaker shop.[12]

What doesn’t show up in the census was daughter Sally Ann. She was the only girl of the children born so far but did not live long. Born on 22 September 1861 she lived only 18 months and passed away on 26 December 1862.[13]

In 1880, Jacob’s household was smaller as the older children grew up and set out on their own. However, Jacob wasn’t done with his own family yet! Jacob (49) and Susanna (44) were still raising Josiah (12) and Arman (11) along with younger children Mary (7), George (5) and William (2).[14]

Screen Shot 2015-06-21 at 2.05.58 PM

Jacob’s handwritten sheet listing his children “one after the other and living.”

The list of Jacob and Susanna’s children looked like this in 1880:

  1. Emmanuel James, born 08 September 1852
  2. John Joseph, born 03 July 1854
  3. Jacob H., born 23 January 1856
  4. Aaron Jerome, born 03 November 1857
  5. Samuel Paul, born 04 September 1859
  6. Sally Ann, born 22 September 1861
  7. Charles Frederic, born 21 July 1863
  8. Pherman Johnson, born 21 July 1865
  9. Jesiah Kichlein, born 08 July 1866
  10. Armon S., born 27 July 1869
  11. Mary Elizabeth, 24 August 1872
  12. George A., born 12 March 1875
  13. William H., born 02 October 1877
  14. Stillborn child with unknown birth date

Most of the birth information[15] comes from a handwritten sheet that Jacob sent to the Pension Bureau when filing for a pension claim. Sally Ann, was not listed because she died on 26 December 1862 at 18 months old. Charles Frederic, was not listed since he died 04 October 1881.[16] Both died before The Act of 27 June 1890 authorizing the payment of pension to Civil War Veterans.

Jacob was last found in the 1900 U.S. census. Jacob (69) and Susanna (63) were still living in Pocono Township. Their son William (22) was the only child left in the household. Jacob’s profession was shoemaker and William was working as a day laborer.[17]

In the later years of his life Jacob suffered from rheumatism. He began suffering from pains in his legs, arms and hips shortly after his return from the war in 1864. Sometimes the attacks were so acute it prevented him from leaving his house.[18] As a result, Jacob filed an invalid claim for a pension for serving in the military. He was granted the pension and received $12 a month. On 05 February 1905, Mr. Scott, from the Committee on Pensions, submitted a report to the U.S. Senate[19] requesting the increase of Jacob’s pension up to $24 per month. The report listed all the things physically wrong with Jacob at the time:

  • Rheumatism
  • Disease of the heart
  • Hemorrhagic retinitis
  • Post polar cataracts (right and left)

The result of these ailments was that Jacob was virtually blind (vision of two two-hundreths in the right eye and three two-hundreths in the left), unable to labor, and so crippled with rheumatism that he was hardly able to walk. He required assistance in dressing and undressing.

Just two short years after the Senate bill, Jacob’s ailments proved too much for him. He died on 14 January 1907 at his residence. Peter Warner, the undertaker, picked his body up and embalmed him that same day. Three days later, on the 17th, the undertaker buried Jacob at the cemetery in Bartonsville.[20]

Jacob has a simple gravestone in Custard’s Cemetery which is also known as St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Cemetery.[21] I like that someone still takes the time to remember his military service by planting an American flag at his grave.[22]

REPSHER Jacob H - Find a Grave

 


[1] http://www.newtonnj.net/Pages/merriamshoefact.htm, “The H.W. Merriam Shoe Company: Shoes From Cradle to College”
[2] Tipton, Jim, compiler, “Stockholm Methodist Church Cemetery,” digital image, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 November 2011), entry for Jacob H. Repsher, memorial #17379662.
[3] Donald R. Repsher, “First Generation in America” (Bath, Pennsylvania:  self-published, 2006), 29. This a a copy of Mr. Repsher’s register report starting with Joannes Rebscher (1729 – 1807) and his descendants. Documentation sources are included but not attached to individual facts. There are numerous references to church records.
[4] 1850 U. S. census, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Jackson Township, p. 25 (stamped), dwelling [unreadable], family 6, John Repsher; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 February 2012); citing NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 798.
[5] Jacob Repsher (Pvt., Co. I, 147th Pa. Inf., Civil War), pension no. W.C. 632,252; Civil War and Later Pension Files; Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Affidavit of Jno. D. Frailey, dated 28 December 1864.
[6] 1860 U. S. census, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Pocono Township, p. 153 (penned), dwelling 1062, family 1033, Jacob H. Repsher; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 November 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 1142.
[7] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoemaking
[8] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cordwainer
[9] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobbler
[10] Jacob Repsher (Pvt., Co. I, 147th Pa. Inf., Civil War), pension no. W.C. 632,252; Civil War and Later Pension Files; Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Affidavit of Jacob Repsher, dated 05 November 1884.
[11] 1870 U. S. census, Monroe County, Pennsylvannia, population schedule, Pocono Township, p. 6 (penned), dwelling 44, family 44, Jacob H. Repsher; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 November 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication M593, roll 1376.
[12] Jacob Repsher (Pvt., Co. I, 147th Pa. Inf., Civil War), pension no. W.C. 632,252; Civil War and Later Pension Files; Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Affidavit of Samuel Musselman, dated 26 August 1907.
[13] Donald R. Repsher, “First Generation in America” (Bath, Pennsylvania:  self-published, 2006), 35.
[14] 1880 U. S. census, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Pocono Township, ED 223, p. 3 (penned), dwelling 24, family 25, Jacob H. Repsher; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 November 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T9, roll 1157.
[15] Jacob Repsher (Pvt., Co. I, 147th Pa. Inf., Civil War), pension no. W.C. 632,252; Civil War and Later Pension Files; Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Undated lined paper listing the children of Jacob Repsher.
[16] Tipton, Jim, compiler, “St. John’s Cemetery,” digital image, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 24 June 2014), entry for Frederick F. Repsher, memorial #93923398.
[17] 1900 U. S. census, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Pocono Township, ED 135, p. 2A (penned), dwelling 23, family 25, Jacob H. Repsher; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 November 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1442.
[18] Jacob Repsher (Pvt., Co. I, 147th Pa. Inf., Civil War), pension no. W.C. 632,252; Affidavit of Jacob Repsher, dated 05 November 1884.
[19] Jacob Repsher (Pvt., Co. I, 147th Pa. Inf., Civil War), pension no. W.C. 632,252; Calendar No., 3565, report no. 3697, dated 06 February 1905.
[20] Jacob Repsher (Pvt., Co. I, 147th Pa. Inf., Civil War), pension no. W.C. 632,252; Affidavit of Peter Warner, dated 25 February 1907.
[21] “Pennsylvania Veterans Burial Cards, 1777-1999,” digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 November 2011), entry for Jacob H. Repsher, St. John’s Cemetery, Monroe County, Pennsylvania; citing Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Bureau of Archives and History. Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.
[22] Tipton, Jim, compiler, “St. John’s Cemetery,” digital image, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 12 November 2011), entry for Jacob H. Repsher, memorial #17379662

Advertisements

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #25 – Samuel Longcor

Relationship: 3rd Great-grandfather
Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 2.21.53 PM


Screen Shot 2015-06-22 at 6.05.40 PM

Samuel Longcor

Samuel Longcor was a handsome man. As an adult, he wore a full beard, neatly trimmed. He had piercing, light-colored eyes. A high forehead met his hair a little further back then when he was younger, but he still had good hair.

My 3rd great-grandfather lived his whole life in New Jersey. He was born in Sussex County on 05 June 1827 to parents George Longcor and Hannah Clark.[1]

Farming was a significant industry in New Jersey in the early and mid-1800s. Samuel Longcor was no different than many of his relatives and neighbors and made his living raising crops nourished by the fertile soil of Sussex County.

Before the 1850 census, which was taken on the 22nd day of October, Samuel met and married his wife Hannah Eliza who went by the given name of Eliza. She was the daughter of  John Willson and Mary Ayers and was born 10 August 1828 in New Jersey.[2] By the end of 1850, Samuel (22) and Eliza (21) had set up house in Sparta and Samuel was farming.[3]

Samuel and Hannah’s first child was a daughter and they named her Hannah Jane. Hannah Jane was born in January of 1851 in New Jersey.[4] She would be an only child for a time as their second daughter wasn’t born until about 1858.[5]

In 1860, with the Civil War looming on the horizon, the Longcor household consisted of Samuel (33), Eliza (32), Hannah Jane (9) and young Mary (2) and they were living in Frankford Township within Sussex County.[6]

Two years after the war broke out, Samuel was required to register for the draft. In June of 1863, he stood in line with others and gave his name (Samuel Longcor), his age at 1st July 1863 (36), his race (white), his occupation (farmer) and his place of birth (New Jersey). At 36 he was probably considered to old to serve but if things went bad, they might need him.

Samuel was doing well enough in the 1860s to be listed on the tax roles. Along with Phillip Wyker, Samuel Longcor was assessed $8.33 of tax (rate of 8/12 in class B) on distillation of apples valued at $12.50 on 14 September 1863. He was engaged in business as a firm called Wyker and Longcor in the Wykertown.[7] Unfortunately, the tax roles of 1865 weren’t quite as descriptive. Samuel Longcor was assessed $1.08 of tax (rate of 2-1/2 ) on gross receipts of $43.00 on 07 February 1865 in the town of Sparta.[8] ($43 = about $837.00 in 2015.)

By 1870, Samuel and Eliza’s household had grown a few members. Their son George W. had arrived around 1861. They had also gained a son-in-law. The U.S. Census listed their household in Frelinghuysen, Sussex County, as Samuel (42), Hannah E. (44), Mary (12), George (7), William Hunt (28), Jennie H. (19) and young Belle (10/12).[9] Samuel had real estate valued at $9,000 and personal property valued at $1,200. He was still making his living as a farmer. I suspect that the enumerator mixed up Samuel and Eliza ages. Also, he listed Eliza as Hannah E. and daughter Hannah Jane as Jennie.

When the 1880 census was taken, daughter Hannah Jane and William had moved into their own household and it is unclear where daughter Mary was. The remainder of the family, Samuel(53), Eliza(53) and son George (17), were living in Hampton Township.[10] Consistent with years prior, Samuel was listed as a farmer.

Over the years, it may seem like Samuel and Eliza did a lot of moving around Sussex County. In actuality, Sparta, Wykertown, Hampton Township, Frelinghuysen, and Frankford are quite close and I’m sure that Samuel was always on the look out for better land on which to farm. Check out my blog post on the joys of finding a New Jersey township map (http://wp.me/p4WHi0-14) and you will see the relationship of the localities mentioned in this post.

Samuel was almost 70 when he passed away. His death certificate showed he was still farming. Samuel’s cause of death was cerebral apoplexy which translates into layman’s terms as a stroke in the brain. He died on 06 Jan 1897.[11]


[1] New Jersey Department of State, death certificate L40 (1897), Samuel Longcor; New Jersey State Archives, Trenton.
[2] New Jersey Department of State, death certificate L58 (1892), Eliza Longcor; New Jersey State Archives, Trenton.
[3] 1850 U. S. census, Sussex County, New Jersey, population schedule, Sparta, p. 180 (stamped), dwelling 72, family 277, Samuel Longcor; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 November 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 464.
[4] 1900 U. S. census, Sussex County, New Jersey, population schedule, Lafayette Township, ED 169, p. 7B (penned), dwelling 159, family 170, William H. Hunt; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 30 September 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 995.
[5] 1860 U. S. census, Sussex County, New Jersey, population schedule, Frankford Township, p. 3 (penned), dwelling 14, family 15, Samuel Longcor; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 November 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 709.
[6] Ibid.
[7] “U.S. IRS Tax Assessment Lists, 1862-1918,” digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 November 2011), entry for Samuel Longcor, 14 September 1863,  division 1, district 4,  Sussex County, New Jersey.
[8] “U.S. IRS Tax Assessment Lists, 1862-1918.” Digital image. Samuel Longcor. Ancestry.com. http://www. ancestry.com : 2005
[9] 1870 U. S. census, Warren County, New Jersey, population schedule, Frelinghuysen, p. 22 (penned), dwelling 166, family 179, Samuel Longcor; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 01 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication M593, roll 892.
[10] 1880 U. S. census, Sussex County, New Jersey, population schedule, Hampton Township, ED 179, p. 15 (penned), dwelling 139, family 144, Samuel Longcor; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 November 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T9, roll 798.
[11] New Jersey Department of State, death certificate L40 (1897), Samuel Longcor.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #24 – Enoch Hunt

Relationship: 3rd Great-grandfather
Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 2.10.05 PM


Enoch is an old biblical name taken from the Hebrew word meaning experienced or dedicated. My 3rd great-grandfather’s given name was Enoch and his family name was Hunt, which is quite common. That makes finding the Hunt family ancestors a bit challenging.

Enoch Hunt’s story began when he was born in 06 Apr 1808[1] to parents Ebenezer Hunt and his wife Elizabeth.[2] He was born and raised in Sussex County, New Jersey.

His father, Ebenezer, passed away 11 May 1814[3] when Enoch was only six years old. I don’t have a blog post planned (yet) about Enoch’s mother Elizabeth so this would be a good time to address her marital history. Enoch must have experienced some chaos in his young life related to her marriages.

Elizabeth was first married to a man with the last name of Tepel and had a son with him who was named Peter T. who was born around 1793.[4] Peter later adopted the Hunt surname. In is unknown when or if Peter’s father died. Elizabeth next married Ebenezer Hunt around 1795. Ebenezer and Elizabeth had William and John (possibly twins) about 1797[5] and Enoch in 1808. After Enoch passed away, Elizabeth married a man named Nathaniel Salmon.[6] There is no record of any children with Nathaniel but Enoch must have spent time in the household with Elizabeth and Nathaniel Salmon.

At the age of 22, Enoch married Martha Decker on 13 May 1830.[7] Together, they have one son, Theodore, born 25 July 1834[8] and a daughter named Keziah. Keziah’s birth date is unknown[9] but she must have been born before Martha’s death on 22 January 1837.[10] Enoch was left a widower at age 28. With young children to care for, he enters into his second marriage.

At the age of 31, Enoch married Eliza Menard.[11] They were married in 1840 most likely in New Jersey. If you thought Enoch’s mother, Elizabeth, had a blended family, his new wife Eliza Menard rivaled her on the number of children she brought to each marriage! (Since this is supposed to be a post about Enoch I will let you read up on Eliza http://wp.me/p4WHi0-35 in her own post.)

Enoch and Eliza have three children together but only their son William Henry Hunt, born 09 April 1841, lives to adulthood.[12]

By 1850, Enoch was living in Newark, New Jersey and working as a printer.[13] His household consisted of Enoch (36), wife Eliza(46), their son William(9) and Eliza’s son Lyman(11). It was unclear why they have moved from rural Sussex County to the more urban city of Newark. Most likely, Enoch was following his profession to where the work existed.

By 1860, Enoch (52) had moved to New York. He was living in Weschester County in the town of Morrisania and working as a foreman. With him in New York were his wife Eliza (50) and Eliza’s son Lyman (22).[14] Remarkably, Eliza has only aged four years since the last census ten years ago…

At some point before 1866, Enoch moved his family back to New Jersey. I would speculate that it had something to do with the outbreak of the Civil War.

When Enoch’s father Ebenezer died, Enoch became a land owner. Enoch Hunt and his wife Eliza granted 30 acres more or less to Job J. Decker for the sum of $200.00.  The land description is “of wood land bounded by land of the Morris Canal Company, Benjamin Rose decd and others and is the same land of which Ebenezer Hunt died seized in about the year eighteen hundred and thirteen since which time it has been owned occupied and possessed by his sons William Hunt (now deceased) John Hunt, and the said Enoch Hunt.”  The indenture is dated 13 November 1866[15] only eight days before Enoch’s death.

Enoch lived to see the end of the war but not too long after that. He passes away on 21 November 1866 in Andover, Sussex County, New Jersey.[16] His cause of death was listed as “cronick” on his death certificate and the information in his step-son Lyman’s pension file states that he died of a chronic inflammation of the stomach.


[1] Membership application, Marianna Hunt Wells, National no. 183172, on Ebenezer Hunt (1758-1814, New Jersey), approved 02 February 1922; National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, Office of the Registrar General, Washington, D.C.
[2] New Jersey State Archives, State Death Registers, AF:781, no. 4, Enoch Hunt; 21 November 1866 New Jersey State Archives, Trenton.
[3] New Jersey Department of State, estate inventory 1424S (1814), Ebenezer Hunt; New Jersey State Archives, Trenton.
[4] Membership application, Marianna Hunt Wells, National no. 183172.
[5] Ibid.
[6] Sussex County, New Jersey, Deed Book T2: 67-71, Nathanial Salmon and his wife and Peter T. Hunt to Azariah Hunt, indenture, 10 Janurary 1820; Hall of Records, Newton.
[7]  Membership application, Marianna Hunt Wells, National no. 183172.
[8] Ibid.
[9] Civil War and Later Pension Files. Department of Veterans Affairs. William H. Hunt (Pvt., Co. I, 70th NY. Inf., Civil War), pension no. WC 852,451. Affidavit of Zeziah Washer taken at Jersey City, New Jersey, 02 February 1887.
[10] “Died,” obituary, Sussex Register, 06 February 1837, unknown page, right hand column; Bound newspaper stacks, Sussex County Historical Society, Newton, New Jersey.
[11] Civil War and Later Pension Files. Department of Veterans Affairs. Lyman Wood (Pvt., Co. G, 83rd NY militia, Civil War), pension no. W.C. 446,752; Civil War and Later Pension Files; Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Form 3-012, Affidavit of Mrs. Eliza Hunt, exhibit J, taken at Branchville Junction, Sussex County, New Jersey, 05 September 1882.
[12] Ibid.
[13] 1850 U. S. census, Essex County, New Jersey, population schedule, Newark, p. 148B, dwelling 337, family 542, Enoch Hunt; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 01 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication M432, roll 447.
[14] 1860 U. S. census, Westchester County, New York, population schedule, Morrisania, p. 309 (penned), dwelling 2126, family 2403, Enoch Hunt; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 01 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 878.
[15] Sussex County, New Jersey, Deed Book P5: 109-111, Enoch Hunt and wife to Job J. Decker, indenture, 13 November 1866; Hall of Records, Newton.
[16] New Jersey State Archives, State Death Registers, AF:781, no. 4, Enoch Hunt; 21 November 1866 New Jersey State Archives, Trenton.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #23 – Caroline (Bonser) Repsher

Relationship: 2nd Great-grandmother
Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 1.58.07 PM


Since I talked about John Joseph Repsher (http://wp.me/p4WHi0-4W) last week, it only seems fitting to talk about his wife Caroline Bonser this week. Like many of the woman who appear as early ancestors in my tree, the information about her is sparse as a fully developed person and she is defined quite a lot by her husband and family.

Like her husband, Caroline Bonser was born in the rural hills of eastern Pennsylvania. She was born on 23 April 1858 in Pocono Lake, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, to parents Daniel Bonser and his wife Emmaline.[1]

There are alternative birth dates for Caroline though. Working back from the death death on her death certificate, 69 years 6 months and 22 days puts her birthdate as 22 April 1857.  The death certificate lists the actual date as April 21, 1857.[2] Family records lists her birthdate as 23 April 1858.

According to family group sheet records prepared by Caroline’s daughter-in-law, Anna (Karthaeuser) Repsher, Caroline’s mother Emmaline was married twice.

  1. Emmaline’s first husband’s name was John Heckman and they had four children together. The children from the first marriage were John, Joseph, Sally and Lydia.
  2. Emmaline’s second husband was Daniel (note: the family records listed in the citation below have him as James) Bonser and they also had four children together. The children from the second marriage were Caroline, James (a bachelor who died in 1911), Lewis and Anna.[3]

There are some discrepancies when comparing this information to U.S. Census records.

Caroline was first found in the 1860 U.S. Census with parents Daniel and Emmaline Bonser.[4] She was 2 years old and her 1/2 brother Joseph (7) and 1/2 sister Sally (5) were listed before her. There was no listing for either John or Lydia.

Next, the Bonser family was found in the 1870 U.S. census. In the household are Daniel (45) and Emmaline (40) along with children Caroline(12), Anne (9), Malinda (7), Lewis (4) and 1/2 sister Sally Heckman (15).[5] That means Caroline, Anna and Lewis match the above information about the second marriage but Malinda does not. Could this be Lydia and she was incorrectly identified as a child of the first marriage? More information would be needed to make this assumption. Also, James was no where to be found.

About five years after the 1870 census, Caroline (now 17 or 18 years old) sets up her own household when she marries John Joseph Repsher around 1875/76. They have a large family, 14 children in all with twelve surviving to adulthood and two stillborn children. (A complete listing of the children is in her husband John’s biography, just click on the link above.) Having a large family means that Caroline was pregnant or nursing from February 1876 to late 1901, a span of 25 years!

She was a housewife and as far as I can tell never worked outside the home. Taking care of the family was more than enough to keep her busy, I’m sure.

Caroline’s death certificate showed that she died on 13 November 1926 of a cerebral hemorrhage.[6] She was laid to rest next to her husband, John Joseph Repsher, in the Analomink United Methodist Churchyard on 17 November 1926.[7]

REPSHER John J and Caroline - Find a Grave

John J. and Caroline B. Repsher’s grave marker, Find-A-Grave memorial #18041315

 


[1]Anna (Karthaeuser) Repsher, compiler, “Family Record of J. J. Repsher Jr. and Caroline Repsher nee Bonser”; (Handwritten family group sheets, Netcong, New Jersey, 1911-1970), p. 2; privately held by blog author, Tucson, AZ, 2015.
[2] Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate file no. 111239 (1926), Caroline Repsher; Division of Vital Statistics, New Castle.
[3] Anna (Karthaeuser) Repsher, compiler, p. 196.
[4] 1860 U. S. census, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Tunkhannock Township, p. 147 (penned), dwelling 887, family 942, Daniel Bonser; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2006); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 1142.
[5] 1870 U. S. census, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Jackson, p. 8 (penned), dwelling 49, family 55, Daniel Bonser; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 21 June 2015); citing NARA microfilm publication M593, roll 1376.
[6] Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate file no. 111239 (1926), Caroline Repsher; Division of Vital Statistics, New Castle.
[7] Tipton, Jim, compiler, “Analomink United Methodist Churchyard,” digital image, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 29 June 2013), entry for Caroline B. Repsher, memorial #18041315.