Sunday’s Obituary – Audrey (Hunt) Strait – Died 07-February-1970

Relationship to me: Great grandmother

This clipping for Audrey (Hunt) Strait was found in the vertical files of the Sussex County Historical Society in Newton, New Jersey.

strait-mrs-ora

“Mrs. Ora Strait” – Funeral services for Mrs. Audrey R. Strait of 44 Pine St., Newton, were conducted yesterday (Saturday) afternoon at the Smith-McCracken Funeral Home, 63 High St., Newton, with the Rev. Allan Davis, pastor of the Newton First Baptist Church, officiating.  Interment followed in North Church Cemetery.  Mrs. Strait, 81, died Thursday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bernice Wood of Newton, after a brief illness.  Born in Branchville, she lived in Newton all of her life.  Mrs. Strait was a member of the Newton First Baptist Church and had been the former organist of the church.  She was the widow of Ora S. Strait who died in 1918.  In addition to her daughter, she leaves a son, Carl of Andover; eight grandchildren, and 17 great-grandchildren.

screen-shot-2016-11-07-at-5-57-21-pmAnother clipping was in the possession of my grandmother Beatrice Strait (Audrey’s daughter-in-law) from an unnamed newspaper.

“Mrs. Ora Strait” – Newton – Mrs. Audrey Hunt Strait of 44 Pine St., widow of Ora Strait, died yesterday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bernice Wood at 43 Sussex St.  She was 81.   Mrs. Strait was born in Branchville and lived here most of her life.  She was a member of the First Baptist Church of Newton and a former organist at the church.  She leaves also a son, Carl of Andover;  eight grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren.  Services will be Saturday at 2 p.m. at Smith McCracken Funeral Home, 63 High St.

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Orville D. Strait – Died 03-April-1908

Relationship to me: Great grand uncle

Orville D. Strait has a published obituary and a published death notice.

The obituary was published in the Sussex (New Jersey) Independent, 10 April 1908.

STRAIT Orville D 2Orville D. Strait” – Orville D. Strait, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ira W. Strait, of Hamburg, died at his home near Beaver Run Friday last, aged twenty-five years, one month and nine days.  Besides his parents he is survived by a wife and one child; four brothers, Ora S., of Beaver Run; Asa, of Hamburg; Adam and Ward, at home, and two sisters, Mrs. Isaac Jennings, of Hamburg, and Mary, at home.  Funeral services were held at the Hamburg Baptist Church Monday afternoon at 1 o’clock, Rev. D. M. Lennox officiating, assisted by Rev. J. K. Baillie.

The death notice was much shorter, published in the New Jersey Herald, 16 April 1908

strait-orville-d“STRAIT” – April 3, at Beaver Run.  Orville D. Strait, aged 25 years.

 

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Donald Strait Wood – Died 11-Februay-1984

Relationship to me: 1st cousin, 1x removed

Donald Strait Wood’s obituary was printed in an unnamed newspaper on February 13, 1984. This is a clipping my grandmother Beatrice Strait had in her collection.

wood-donald-strait“Donald Wood” – Donald Strait Wood, 52, of Jacksonville, Florida, died Saturday after a long illness at the Methodist Hospital Hospice in Jacksonville.  He was born in Newton and moved to Florida 30 years ago, where he owned and operated his own sheet metal business.  He is survived by his wife, Beverly; four sons, Donald of Reno, Nev., James, Mark and Scott, all of Daytona, Fla.; four daughters, Susan Ferguson of Daytona, Linda Bowles, Kathleen and Patricia Wood, all of Jacksonville; two brothers, Richard of Newton, and Robert of Guilford, Me.; and eight grandchildren.  Funeral services will be held Wednesday in Jacksonvil-”  [clipping ends here]

52 Documents in 52 Weeks #10 – William Charles Strait’s Form SS-5

SCAN0312

William Charles Strait, Sr.

Person of Interest: William Charles Strait
Relationship: Grandfather


Source Citation: William Charles Strait, SS no. 146-10-5034, 03 December 1936, Applicaton for Account Number (Form SS-5), Social Security Administration, Baltimore, Maryland.


Document Description: This document looks to be a photocopy of the microfilm of an original document stored at the Social Security Administration (SSA) in Baltimore Maryland. It is 5-1/2″ by 10″ in size but it is not clear from this document whether the scale has been adjusted for copying convenience. The form is the standard SS-5 Form which is an application for a Social Security Card and the form was created by the SSA. The original appears to have been tri-folded possibly to mail it in a smaller envelope.


Background information regarding Social Security: You can’t get away from doing some history homework while researching your genealogical records. It’s just not going to happen! The documents created by the Social Security Administration are no different. Knowing the progression of the laws surrounding Social Security help the researcher navigate records and point to where the documents can be found. According to the introduction provided by Social Security Administration website “this background material [1969 Abe Bortz book and the 1976 Newman “Preliminary Inventory”] is the narrative involving SSA’s organizational history. This is vital to navigating the Social Security records since they are almost always stored and cataloged by title of the SSA organization which created the records.” The Committee for Economic Security was established in June 1934 in response to the economic crisis brought about by the Great Depression. The committee was tasked with providing legislative recommendations to relieve economic insecurities. The committee presented its recommendations to President Franklin D. Roosevelt in January of 1935. Their recommendations, Roosevelt’s own ideas, and Congress’ ideas were all merged to create the Social Security Bill (R.R. 7260, Public Law No. 271, 74th Congress) which was signed into law on August 14, 1935.

People began applying for their unique Social Security Number shortly after 1935 and this SS-5 form was created to facilitate the issuing of numbers. The numbers are a nine-digit number which originally were in an “AAA-GG-SSSS” format. The first three digits were geographically related and the “numbers were assigned beginning in the northeast and moving south and westward, so that people on the east coast had the lowest numbers and those on the west coast had the highest numbers.”[1] The middle two digits represent a group number that, for administrative reasons, were not assigned in consecutive order. There was some logic that involved assigning even and odd numbers into four broad groups:

  1. odd numbers from 01 through 09
  2. even numbers from 10 through 98
  3. even numbers from 02 through 08
  4. odd numbers from 11 through 99

The last four digits are serial numbers are were issued consecutively within the assigned group number. However, to combat the modern problem of identity theft, in June of 2011 the SSA began a randomization project to eliminate the geographical significance of the first three digits.

Copies of a person’s Social Security Applications can be ordered only if the person is deceased. The application and some instructions can be found at the Social Security Administration website. There is a fee and some rules around how to order. You will be required to furnish proof of death if the person was born less than 120 years ago. Make sure to read up on all the requirements so that you don’t waste your money or delay getting your documents!


william-charles-strait-ss-applicationDocument Scan and Transcription: Form SS-5 Header
Treasury Department
Internal Revenue Service
U. S. Social Security Act
Application for Account Number
146-10-5034 [penned above the top line on the form]

Form SS-5 Body
1. Employee’s first name: William
1. Middle name: Charles
1. Last name: Strait [there is a “363” penned in after his last name]
1. (Married woman give maiden first name, maiden last name, and husband’s last name)
2. Street and Number: Brooklyn Road
3. Post office and state: Stanhope, New Jersey
4. Business name of present employer: Darlington Fabrics, Inc.
5. Business address of present employer: Mill Street, Newton, N.J.
6. Age at last birthday: 26
7. Date of birth, month-day-year, subject to later verification: 7 17 1910
8: Place of birth: Sparta Township [NJ pended in after this]
9: Father’s full name: Ora Simpson Strait
10. Mothers full maiden name: Audrey Hunt
11. Sex: Male/Female, check which: Male [checked]
12: Color: White, Negro, Other (specify), check which: White [checked]
13: If registered with the U. S. Employment Service, give number of registration card: No
14. If you have previously filled out a card like this, State place and date: No
15. Date: 12-3-1936
16: Employee’s signature, as usually written: William Strait [signature]

Detach along this line.


Analysis: This document has some powerful genealogical information contained within it. Especially nice is the request for either the applicant’s full or maiden name, if a married female, and the full maiden name of the applicant’s mother. It can be hard to ferret out a female’s maiden name and this application asks for those items specifically. From this form, a short biography for William Charles Strait can be written:

26-year-old William Charles Strait was working for Darlington Fabrics, Inc. located on Mill Street in Newton, New Jersey, on 03 December 1936 when he applied for his Social Security Number. He was born on 17 July 1910 to parents Audrey Hunt and Ora Simpson Strait. At the time he was living on Brooklyn Road in Stanhope, New Jersey, and commuting to work in Newton. He was a white male that was assigned SS#146-10-5034.

I have used this form to find the parent’s of some Repsher cousins when parentage was unclear. This can be especially useful when you have a number of people with the same name in the family. Straits and Repshers, I’m talking to you!

This SS-5 Form is an original document in that it looks to be a strict photocopy of the microfilm of the original records. There are no apparent changes to the document (no redaction or overprinting) and is in William’s original writing. It provides a nice example of his signature in case I need to compare it to other documents.

The information on the document that is primary (firsthand) relates to William’s current address, his age, his gender, his race, his employer, and his employer’s address. The secondary information relates to his birth date (he doesn’t remember his birth date, his parents have told him), his birth place, and his parents. It may seem weird that his age is primary when his birth date is secondary. While he wouldn’t remember his birth date, he can attest to the number of years that are passing that make up his age.

The evidence is direct in relation to the research question of, “When was William Charles Strait of New Jersey born and who were his parents?” in that the questions are explicitly answered by this form. The evidence that his parents were married would be indirect in that some other evidence must be combined with this to prove that his parents were legally married or presenting themselves as a wedded couple. Parentage and marriage are not necessarily the same thing.

CONCLUSION

This SS-5 form is a great genealogical resource. It can be useful in finding birth dates, places, parents’ names, maiden names, and current employment information. It can, however, be a bit tricky when ordering this record if you don’t have the applicant’s Social Security number, need to provide proof that the applicant is dead, or need to show that both of the applicant’s parents are deceased (born less than 120 years ago), especially when the purpose of ordering the application is to find out parents names. There wasn’t anything surprising that I learned about my grandfather by ordering this form but it does help provide confidence that I’ve done reasonably exhaustive research into this ancestor.


[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_number