Sepia Saturday – November 2017 – Mustache or Beard

The prompt picture I’ve chosen from Sepia Saturday for November is a picture of four dapper blokes, all with mustaches, lounging about with their ale. It is Sepia’s number 395, which is out of sync with my ending 2016 Sepia Saturday numbering, but it’s my blog. My rules. That said, I’m going with the mustache as my theme for this month.

Before we talk about mustaches in the family, I’d like to point out that it’s also an appropriate theme for November. There has been a recent movement called Movember that has been established to bring attention to men’s health. They hold all sorts of fundraising events which involve men growing out their mustaches. Check out their website for more information.

The first person I think of with a mustache is my dear old Dad. He still has a beard and a mustache but back in the 1970s and early 1980s he had a magnificent handlebar mustache. Observe:

Handle bar mustaches come with all sorts of grooming paraphernalia. There is a little comb to keep it neat. Some wax to help it hold its shape. Some finishing wax to give it sheen and support. But the results of all that care are quite nice.

The second person that comes to mind when thinking of mustaches is my 2nd great-grandfather, William Henry Hunt. Here he is, later in life, posing with both his mustache and Civil War rifle. It was a bushy mustache and snowy white by the time this picture was taken.

Another person that was seldom seen without a mustache was “Uncle Billy.” William Knox was married to William Henry Hunt’s sister, Belle. Here is Uncle Billy with some of his chickens.

Those are the best pictures of just mustaches. However, I do have a couple of pictures of other relatives with some full facial hair. This is my 3rd great-grandfather Samuel Longcor. I love his beard and he has quite piercing eyes. 

Another 3rd great-grandfather has a full, dark beard. This is Ludwig Karthäuser. He also has some intense eyes.

Most of the ancestors of whom I have pictures are clean shaven. But I hope you’ve enjoyed the few in the tree that have some sort of facial hair. Happy Movember to you!

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Sepia Saturday – October 2017 – Little Girls in White Dresses

The prompt picture I’ve chosen from Sepia Saturday for October is a portrait of a little girl in a frilly, white dress. It is their number 389 which is out of sync with my ending 2016 Sepia Saturday numbering. I chose it for October because I have a few photos of little girls in white dresses.

The first is of my great-grandmother, Anna M. Karthaeuser. Like the prompt photo, she was posing in a photographer’s studio, most likely on Staten Island, New York, around the turn of the 20th century. It has some of the same elements as the prompt photo: flowers in a vase, a girl in a white dress, and a large piece of furniture. She has a sweet expression on her face and her long-sleeved dress is jazzed up a bit with a dark sash tied into a big bow at her right hip. The ruffles on the hem are very much like the prompt picture.

Anna M. Karthaesuser, circa 1892

I have a later photograph of Anna in her First Holy Communion dress which was also probably taken in New York City. Her hair is very long and worn loosely over her shoulders. It is obviously taken at photographer’s studio as the backdrop and curtain on the right are a dead giveaway.

For comparison, I have my Aunt Sadie (my Dad’s sister) in her First Holy Communion dress. Her hairstyle is a bit shorter but the standards for dress hadn’t changed much since her grandmother, Anna M. Karthaeuser, had her photo taken. I’ve cropped the photo to highlight the dress.

Mercedes Marie Strait, circa 1945

But the untouched photo has a lot of interesting detail in it. Notice the house on the right with the white porch railing, the low wall she’s standing in front of, and the decorative lathe on the garage/barn on the left in the background. 

Those are my girls in little white dresses. No burning story this month, just some shared photos!

Sunday’s Obituary – Herbert David Freeman – Died 17-August-2005

Relationship to me: father-in-law of 1/2 2nd cousin (how’s that for convoluted?)

This obituary was published in Star-Ledger on August 19, 2005 and can be found online (for a fee, since it’s now archived, thus the truncated image) at Legacy.com.

screen-shot-2016-11-17-at-4-34-39-pm“Herbert David Freeman” – FREEMAN – Entered into rest on Aug. 17, 2005, Herbert David, of Mays Landing, loving husband of Eleanor “Elly” (nee Gordon), devoted father of Herbert Freeman (Kristine) and Claire Karthaeuser (Paul), brother of Barbara Ferris, also survived by his adored granddaughters, Katie and Anna Freeman. Relatives and friends may call at The WILFRED ARMITAGE & WIGGINS FUNERAL HOME, 596 Belgrove Dr., Kearny, on Friday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Masonic Service at 7 p.m. with a funeral service to follow. Private Cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, 1332 N. Halstead St., Suite 201, Chicago, Il. 60622 or Livada Orphan Care, P.O. Box 1771, Windsor, Ca. 95492.

I also have another item, but no image, about him published in Star-Ledger on August 19, 2005:

“Herbert David Freeman,” 66, Pru analyst, Guardsman for 22 years, a Masonic service for Herbert David Freeman, 66, of Mays Landing will be at 7 o’clock this evening in the Wilfred Armitage and Wiggins Funeral Home, 596 Belgrove Dr., Kearny.  Mr. Freeman, who died Wednesday in Atlantic Care Regional Medical Center, Pomona, was a systems analyst for Prudential in Newark, where he worked for 40 years before retiring in 1997.  He served in the National Guard from 1957 to 1979. He was a past master of the North Arlington F&AM Lodge 271. Born in Newark, he lived in Mays Landing for several years.  Surviving are his wife, Eleanor; a son, Herbert; a daughter, Claire Karthaeuser; a sister, Barbara Ferris, and two grandchildren.

Sunday’s Obituary – Anna Marie (Karthaeuser) Repsher – Died 23-September-1970

Relationship to me: paternal great-grandmother

I have a couple of undated, unsourced obituaries for Anna K. Repsher, one is most likely from the Newark Star-Ledger and the other from the New Jersey Herald. Both were clippings in Beatrice’s collection which I inherited.

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“Mrs. G.A. Repsher Of Stanhope, 81” – Stanhope – Mrs. Anna M. Repsher of 19 Hill Road, widow of George A. Repsher, died Wednesday in Dover General Hospital. She was 81.

Mrs. Repsher was born in Port Richmond, N.Y., and had lived her 58 years.

She had retired as an employee [sic] of Dover General Handbag Co., Netcong. Mrs. Repsher was a life member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Musconetcong Post American Legion of Stanhope, the Ladies Auxiliary of the Stanhope Fire Department and the Ladies Auxiliary of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Lakeland Post of Netcong. She was also a member of the Legion of Mary of St. Michael’s Church, Netcong.  She leaves four sons, G. Arthur of Morristown, and Adam O., Robert W. and Henry A., of Stanhope; two daughters, Mrs. Beatrice Strait of Newton and Mrs. Helen Struss of Stanhope; a brother, Charles Karthaeuser of Stirling, and 21 grandchildren and 11 great great-grandchildren.

The funeral will be tomorrow from the Pichi Funeral Home, Main Street, with a Mass at the church.

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“Mrs. George A. Repsher” – Mrs. Anna M. Repsher of 19 Hill Road, Stanhope, died yesterday at Dover General Hospital.  Born in Port Richmond, Staten Island, N.Y., she was 81.

The widow of George A. Repsher, she was a retired operator for the Dover Handbag Co., Stanhope. She had lived in Stanhope for the past 58 years.

She was a lifetime member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the American Legion, Musconetcong Post 278, a member of the ladies auxiliary of the Stanhope Fire Department, the Ladies Auxiliary of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Lakeland Post 2347, Netcong, and the Legion of Mary, St. Michael Roman Catholic Church, Netcong.

Mrs. Repsher is survived by four sons, G. Arthur of Morristown, Adam O., Robert W. and Harry A., all of Stanhope; two daughters, Mrs. Beatrice Strait of Newton and Mrs. Helen Struss of Stanhope; one brother, Charles Karthaeuser of Sterling, 21 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.

Services will be 9:15 a.m. Saturday from the Pichi Funeral Home, Stanhope, to the St. Michael Roman Catholic Church fo [sic] a 10 a.m. requiem mass.

For an interesting story on the “brother” Charles Karthaeuser please see me post here.

Sepia Saturday #321: Hats Off to You

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Golden, curly locks spill out while blue eyes look out from under a flower-adorned blue bonnet. This vibrant card is one of my Aunt Sadie’s Easter cards in her Shirley Temple scrapbook. Coincidence that Shirley Temple had curls and this girl does too? Not likely, Shirley Temple was one of the most beloved movie stars when Sadie received this card. It’s not a stretch that card makers would want to capitalize on that popularity.

As an embellishment, a real feather tops this little girl’s hat with a splash of canary yellow. Feathers on hats were all the rage at the turn of the 20th century which makes this girl’s feather seem a little subdued. The fashion craze of using feathers as decorations began in the 1870s. By 1886, plume hunting to supply the hat makers’ demand for feathers nearly wiped out certain species of birds. In that year, wild birds were being destroyed at a rate of 5 million per year.[1]

Malheur National Wildlife Refuge has been in the national news lately and it’s interesting that it was set aside to help the wild bird populations rebound. It was established on August 18, 1908, by President Theodore Roosevelt as the Lake Malheur Reservation. Roosevelt set aside unclaimed government lands encompassed by Malheur, Mud and Harney Lakes “as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds.”

According to their website:
“In the late 1880s, plume hunters decimated North American bird populations in pursuit of breeding feathers for the hat industry. Hunters targeted large flocks of colonial nesting birds and shorebirds, killing birds indiscriminately and orphaning chicks. Eventually, the large numbers of colonial nesting birds on Malheur Lake were discovered by plume hunters. In 1908, wildlife photographers William L. Finley and Herman T. Bohlman discovered that most of the white herons (egrets) on Malheur Lake had been killed in 1898 by plume hunters. After 10 years, the white heron population still had not recovered. With backing from the Oregon Audubon Society, Finley and Bohlman proposed establishment of a bird reservation to protect birds, using Malheur, Mud and Harney lakes.”

The signer of the card above, Grandma Repsher, was not immune to this fashion craze. I have a photograph of her as a young girl (she was born in 1890) sporting a fancy hat. She and her mother had their portraits taken at a professional studio in New York City with their feather-topped hats.

The photo below shows Anna Marie Karthaueser in a high-collared white top typical around 1900 for a young woman. She had no earrings, necklace, or broach but she had a fancy hat to fall back on. The large, fluffy plumes in the front highlight the stiffness of the feathers sticking up in the back. The hat was set back far enough on her head to show off her beautiful, wavy hair.

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Anna Marie Karthaeuser, circa 1900

Her mother, Anna W. (Mergenthaler) Karthaeuser, also had a portrait done. Anna W. had a beautiful pin on her hat holding her decorative feathers which swoop back over her left side. She had a pair of pierced earrings and a necklace drops down the front of her blouse. There was a tuft of dark ribbon pinned to her blouse on the left side. She had her hair swept up in an Edwardian fashion and it just covered the tops of her ears. She had the same frank expression as her daughter’s portrait.

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Anna W. (Merkenthaler) Karthaeuser

My next photo is of Anna Marie Karthaeuser and her mother Anna W. Karthaeuser.  For this photo, they stood behind Charles Gruber who was Anna W.’s half-brother. Anna Marie was wearing a white, knee-length dress with a dark sash and a dark full-brimmed hat with a broad ribbon hanging off the back. She was wearing a necklace and had two tufted ribbons (like her mother had in the picture above) pinned to her blouse on the left side. Her mother Anna W. has the same necklace as the portrait above and this photo shows that it’s attached to a watch pinned to her bodice. She had rings on both of her hands, a broach pinned at her throat and pierced earrings. I’m not quite sure what her hat decorations are made of but they were quite elaborate.

Anna Charles and Anna Karthaeuser 097

Anna Marie Karthaeuser, Charles Gruber, Anna W. Karthaeuser

Fancy hats, as everyday wear, have long gone out of style. They are occasionally seen at events like the Kentucky Derby or the functions of British Royalty. Indeed, hats in general have gone by the wayside (I don’t count baseball caps as hats) and they seem to be more of a personality statement when worn in today’s day and age. I am fortunate to have these photos of my ancestors sporting their finest millinery.

The concept behind these weekly Saturday posts can be found at Sepia Saturday Intro.
Theme taken from Sepia Saturday photo: Hats

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[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plume_hunting

Sepia Saturday #318: Passport Puzzle

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This hand-colored card is from Aunt Sadie’s great-grandfather, Adam Karthaeuser. If you run your finger over the dog and the duck, you can feel the colored pencil marks. The paper is slightly wavy due to the drying of the watercolors also used. A close look at the inside cover lettering around the “A Happy” and “Great” reveals guide lines used to keep the lettering straight.

The inscription underneath the card in the scrapbook says, “Sent from Masonic Home in Tappan, N.Y.” The artist’s signature near the dog’s left front foot reads “•Deck•” which is most likely a fellow Masonic Home resident. I have a photo of John Adam Karthaeuser at the German Masonic Home from around 1937:

John Adam Karthaeuser 081

The majority of documents I have found show that Adam (as he was known) was born in Germany.

1900 US Census[1] shows Adam (43) was born in April 1857 in Germany. It also shows he immigrated in 1887, had been in the country 13 years, and was naturalized. He had been married for 15 years which puts his marriage year circa 1885. His occupation was hotel keeper.

1900 US Census - Adam KARTHAEUSERa

1900 census

1910 US Census[2] shows Adam (53) was born in Germany. It also shows he immigrated in 1887 and was naturalized. He had been married for 25 years which puts his marriage year circa 1885. His occupation was Boarding house keeper.

1910 US census - Adam KARTHAEUSERa

1910 census

1920 US Census[3] shows Adam (62) was born in Germany. It also shows he immigrated in 1887 and was naturalized in 1892.

1920 US census - Adam KARTHAEUSERa

1920 census

1930 US Census[4] shows Adam (67) was born in Germany. It also shows he immigrated in 1887 and was naturalized. He was married when he was 27 years old which puts the marriage year circa 1884.

1930 US census - Adam KARTHAEUSERa

1930 census

1940 US Census[5] shows Adam (82) was born in Germany and that he had been naturalized. By this time, he was widowed.

1940 US Census - Adam KARTHAEUSERa

1940 census

His marriage certificate[6] shows that Adam married Anna Merkenthaler on 25 February 1892 in New York City. It shows a very specific birthplace for Adam of Oggersheim, Rhinefalz, Germany.

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So, I was pretty certain that my 2nd great-grandfather was from Germany and was not a United States citizen until he was naturalized in 1892 as evidenced in the 1920 census.

But the marriage certificate highlights a discrepancy in his marriage information. Over all the census years, Adam and/or Anna was very consistent on how long they were married:

  • 1900 – 15 years married = 1885 (1900 less 15)
  • 1910 – 25 years married = 1885 (1910 less 25)
  • 1920 – no info
  • 1930 – married when 25 = 1884 (1857 plus 27)
  • 1940 – widowed

So, why the date of 25 February 1892 on the marriage certificate? Given that he was naturalized in 1892, I would speculate that Adam and Anna decided to get married in New York City where they were currently living. They may not have had their original German marriage certificate or they may just have done it to cement their status as newly-minted citizens of the United States of America. The marriage year around 1885 may have been when they actually considered themselves married and thus what they told the enumerators.

According to his daughter Anna, Adam’s exact birth date was 07 April 1857,[7] which corresponds to the information on the 1900 census. So imagine my surprise when I turned up this passport application.[8]

USM1372_632-0355

This application has the following information:

  • Form was for native citizens, No. 76282
  • Oath of Allegiance sworn on 14 July 1903
  • Passport issued on 15 July 1903
  • Birth Date 07 April 1857 (corresponds to family info)
  • Permanent residence is Rosebank, Staten Island, New York
  • Occupation was hotelier (corresponds to 1900 census info)
  • Applicant is 46 years old (1903 less 46 = 1857, corresponds to censuses)

However, Adam swears in this application that was he born in New York City. He swears his father is a naturalized citizen. All of the censuses contradict this information in that he gave his birthplace as Germany (as well as his parents) when the question was asked by the enumerators. The document has his signature:

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However, I can’t use the card above to compare signatures. I suspect the card maker also did the signature since there are guidelines (as with the other lettering) on the card signature. Adam wouldn’t have needed guidelines for his own signature.

This application happened before people were issued social security numbers so the notary public accepted Adam’s sworn allegiance and the certification of the witness at face value when he notarized the document. It would not have been the notary public’s job to prove the information.

I suspect this application is for my 2nd great-grandfather. I’m not sure why he felt the need to lie about his nativity. Perhaps, there was some event back in the homeland that he needed to attend to or needed to be there for. Perhaps, applications for native born citizens went through quicker. Perhaps, he used the wrong form by mistake. Whatever the reason, it’s now a mystery for us to ponder 100+ years later.

The concept behind these weekly Saturday posts can be found at Sepia Saturday Intro.
Theme taken from Sepia Saturday photo: Dog

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[1] 1900 U. S. census, Richmond County, New York, population schedule, New York City, ED 611, p. 12A (penned), dwelling 203, family 246, Adam Karthaeuser; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1154.
[2] 1910 U. S. census, Richmond County, New York, population schedule, New York City, ED 1322, p. 7B (penned), dwelling 122, family 143, Adam Karthaeuser; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 1073.
[3] 1920 U. S. census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, ED 889, p. 9A (penned), dwelling 100, family 201, Adam Karthaeuser; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T625, roll 1167.
[4] 1930 U. S. census, Hudson County, New Jersey, population schedule, Jersey City, ED 162, page 23A (penned), dwelling 210, family 467, Adam Karthaeuser; digital image, Ancestry (http:www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publicationT626, roll 1356.
[5] 1940 U. S. census, Rockland County, New York, population schedule, Orangetown, ED 44-35, sheet 12B, German Masonic Home, line 53; digital image, Ancestry (http:www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 January 2015); citing NARA microfilm publicationT627.
[6] New York City, New York, marriage certificate no. 124-1892 (1892), Karthaeuser-Mergenthaler, certificate number is penned; Digital copy with Jodi Lynn Strait, Tucson, AZ, 2011.
[7] Anna (Karthaeuser) Repsher, compiler, “Family Record of J. J. Repsher Jr. and Caroline Repsher nee Bonser”; (Handwritten family group sheets, Netcong, New Jersey, 1911-1970), p. 81; privately held by held by Jodi Lynn Strait, Tucson, AZ, 2011.
[8] “U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925,” digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 January 2015), entry for Adam Karthaueser, NARA Series: Passport Applications, 1795-1905; Roll #: 632; Volume #: Roll 632 – 09 Jul 1903-18 Jul 1903.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #32 – Anna W. (Mergenthaler) Karthaeuser

Relationship: 2nd Great-grandmother
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Anna W. Mergenthaler (also spelled as Merkenthaler) was born 24 Februay 1860 in Speyer, Germany.[1] Even though family group sheets prepared by her daughter had her birth year as 1865[2], I have chosen to use the 1860 year as this matches the ages on many of the U.S. Censuses where she was found.

  • 1900 Census, Anna, 40 (Feb 1860) [3]
  • 1910 Census, Anna, 48 [4]
  • 1920 Census, Anna, 59 [5]
  • 1930 Census, Anna, 65 [6] – Here she mysteriously loses 5 years from her age…

Anna’s mother’s name was Marie and seems to have been married twice. First to a man with the last name of Mergenthaler and second to Karl Gruber.[7] While Marie was a Mergenthaler, she had daughter Anna W., son Otto and another daughter whose name is not known. During her marriage to Karl Gruber, she had daughters Katie and Marie and a son named Charles. I have a photo of Marie with her second husband Karl.

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Left to right: Anna Karthaeuser, Maria Gruber, Karl Gruber, Anna (Mrs. John Adam) Karthaeuser, Katie Gruber

On the back of the photo as written:awmk003a

27-year-old Anna made the trip over the Atlantic Ocean with her soon-to-be husband, John Adam Karthaeuser, arriving on 21 April 1887 in New York City.[8] She was married to John Adam on 25 February 1892 in Richmond County, New York, one day after her 32nd birthday.awmk006

A date discrepancy pops out upon continued inspection of the 1900 census. According to the census, Anna and John have been married for 15 years, which would put their marriage date sometime in 1885. That would indicate they were married for two years before immigrating to America. However, on the passenger manifest which is dated 21 April 1887, Anna is listed with her maiden name of Mergenthaler. Adding to the confusion is a marriage certificate which indicates a marriage date of 25 February 1892.[9] This would mean that Anna and John were married in New York almost two (or three) years after their daughter was born in 1889/1890, thus making her born out of wedlock. It would also mean that Anna and JohnScreen Shot 2015-02-28 at 4.10.53 PMwere in America almost five years before they were married. Could it be that they were married in Germany before immigration? If so, then why is Anna W. listed with her maiden name on the manifest? Were they married once in Germany and then married again in New York State? Further investigation is needed to resolve these questions.

Daughter Anna Marie was born to John and Anna Karthauser on 31 March 1889 (possibly 1890) in Port Richmond, Staten Island, New York.[10] They lived and worked in New York City, Anna as a housekeeper and John as hotel/boarding house keeper. (See John’s post:John Karthaeuser).

Anna also raised Charles Karthaeuser as her son. John and Anna’s daughter Anna Marie had a child out of wedlock. (See a detailed story on this on post:http://wp.me/p4WHi0-31) John and Anna took Charles in as their own child and Charles was always introduced to family as Anna’s brother. It is unclear whether Charles was ever told who his biological mother was but I suspect he had been told later in life. Whatever the case, Charles considered Anna his mother and captioned all the photos of her that way.

awmk004Screen Shot 2015-08-08 at 12.47.35 PMBetween 1920 and 1930, John and Anna moved out of New York City to live in Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey. They did some traveling with Anna’s 1/2 brother, Charles Gruber, who had a car that they took on trips.

Anna lived to see her daughter Anna married to George Arthur Repsher on 18 January 1910 in St. John’s Lutheran Evangelical Church located in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania.[11]

She didn’t, however, get to see her son Charles married. Charles was married to Carolyn Louise Franklin on 23 October 1937 in Newark, Essex County, New Jersey. This was two years after Anna had passed away on 03 July 1935 in Hackensack, Bergen, New Jersey. awmk005

Caption reads: “My mother Anna Karthaeuser at Cayuga Sate Park, N.Y. about 1934” From photos of Charles Karthaeuser.


[1] 1900 U. S. census, Richmond County, New York, population schedule, New York City, ED 611, p. 12A (penned), dwelling 203, family 246, Adam Karthaeuser; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1154. Birth city comes from: New York City, New York, marriage certificate no. 124-1892 (1892), Karthaeuser-Mergenthaler, certificate number is penned.
[2] Anna (Karthaeuser) Repsher, compiler, “Family Record of J. J. Repsher Jr. and Caroline Repsher nee Bonser”; (Handwritten family group sheets, Netcong, New Jersey, 1911-1970), p. 81.
[3] 1900 U. S. census, Richmond County, New York, population schedule, New York City, ED 611, p. 12A (penned), dwelling 203, family 246, Adam Karthaeuser; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1154.
[4] 1910 U. S. census, Richmond County, New York, population schedule, New York City, ED 1322, p. 7B (penned), dwelling 122, family 143, Adam Karthaeuser; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 1073.
[5] 1920 U. S. census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, ED 889, p. 9A (penned), dwelling 100, family 201, Adam Karthaeuser; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T625, roll 1167.
[6] 1930 U. S. census, Hudson County, New Jersey, population schedule, Jersey City, ED 162, page 23A (penned), dwelling 210, family 467, Adam Karthaeuser; digital image, Ancestry.com (http:www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 October 2011); citing NARA microfilm publicationT626, roll 1356.
[7] Eleanor G. Freeman, Mays Landing, New Jersey, to Jodi Lynn Strait, hand-written group sheets, 09 March 2012, Karthaeuser documents and pictures.
[8] “New York, Passenger Lists,1820-1857,” digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 December 2014), entry for A. Karthaueser,  Microfilm series M237, Roll 505, List 436, line 126-127, Image 1024. Ship Name: Westerland.  Port of Departure: Antwerp, Belgium.  Port of Arrival: New York.  Place of Origin: Germany.  Arrival Date: April 21, 1887. Citing , National Archives and Records Adminstration, New York Passenger List (Microfilm M237, rolls 95-580 and T715, rolls 5592-6267),  A. Karthaeuser (30) is listed with wife-to-be, Anna Merkenthaler (27).  His occupation is listed as clerk.
[9] New York City, New York, marriage certificate no. 124-1892 (1892), Karthaeuser-Mergenthaler, certificate number is penned.
[10] Anna Karthaeuser, SS no. 142-20-4410, 06 August 1943, Application for Account Number (Form SS-5), Social Security Administration, Baltimore, Maryland.
[11] “Pennslyvania, Church and Town Records, 1708-1985,” digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 02 February 2012), marriage entry #350 for George A. Repsher, St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania; citing Historic Pennsylvania Church and Town Records, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Historical Society of Pennsylvania.