Sunday’s Obituary – Joseph M. Guirreri – Died 30-May-1980

Relationship to me: Paternal step-grandfather

Joseph’s second wife Beatrice (Repsher) Strait had this newspaper clipping from an unnamed newspaper in her collection.

guirreri-joseph

Joseph Guirreri – Joseph Guirreri, 66, of 43 Lincoln Place died Friday in The Beth Israel Hospital Newark. Born in Brooklyn, he lived in Newton all of his life. He had been an employee of the Ludlow Paper Co., Stanhope, retiring 14 years ago. He was an army veteran of WWII. He was a member of the American Association of Retired Persons No. 44 of Newton and St. Joseph’s Friendship Club of Newton. He is survived by his wife, Beatrice; one daughter Mary Ann Ulmer of Newton, one stepdaughter Mercedes M. Scabet of Newton; one stepson, William C. Strait of Newton; one sister, Mrs. Rose DeStefano of Orlando, Fla.; two grandchildren and three step grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Monday at 9:30 a.m. fromthe Smith-McCracken Funeral Home, 63 High Street, Newton to St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church, Newton, for a 10 a.m. Mass of the Resurrection. Burial will be at Newton Cemetery. Friends may call Sunday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m.

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52 Documents in 52 Weeks #49 – Daniel Plant’s Employment

Far left, Nellie and Daniel Plant

Person of Interest: Daniel W. Plant
Relationship: Husband of my great grandaunt Nellie Garfield Hunt


Source Citation: “Mr. Daniel Plant,” employment announcement, New Jersey Herald, 17 September 1908, p. 8, col. 1; Bound newspaper stacks, Sussex County Historical Society, Newton, New Jersey.


Document Description: This is a photo of a newspaper article appearing in a local Sussex County, New Jersey, newspaper. My father took a picture for me and the original newspaper is stored in the bound newspaper stacks in the Sussex County Historical Society on 82 Main Street in Newton, New Jersey. Rather than photo copy an unwieldy bound newspaper volume, he took a digital photo to send to me. The quality is much better and the fragile newspaper wasn’t further manhandled at the copy machine.


Document Scan/Transcription: Mr. Daniel Plant has severed his connections with the meat market and taken a position as agent of the L. & H. R. Railroad at Great Meadows. Daniel is a trustworthy, sober, industrious young man, just the kind railroad men are looking after and want to employ.


Analysis: I love this short little article. It says so much about Daniel and his employment opportunities with the railroad. I like that they actually list the fine qualities he possessed and that these qualities were the type that the railroad was looking for. In a bit of what seems like foreshadowing, the word “severed” is used in this article.

It also provides little tidbits to dig into and questions to answer.

  • Was the meat market well-known enough that the newspaper didn’t need to name it? Answer: Needs investigation.
  • What is the full name of the L. & H. R. Railroad? Answer: Lehigh and Hudson River Railroad. For some great history on this now defunct railroad, check out railfan Marty Feldner’s page at the Lehigh and Hudson River Railway.
  • What are the job responsibilities of an agent of the railroad? Answer: Needs investigation.
  • How young is Daniel? Answer: In 1908, at the time of this employment change, Daniel was 18.
  • Was sobriety an issue in Sussex County around the turn of the century? Why is this particular quality pointed out? Answer: Needs investigation.
  • Where is Great Meadows in location to Lafayette, New Jersey? Answer: About 25 miles southwest of Lafayette and about 18 miles southwest of Newton.

This is an original record as it’s an unedited photo of the actual article that ran in the newspaper. It is undetermined information in that you can’t really figure out who is the informant. Did his proud family submit the information, did a newspaper reporter talk to Daniel himself, or did the information come from a railroad representative? It is direct evidence in that it answers the question, “What did Daniel Plant, of Sussex County, New Jersey, do for a living in 1908?” It is indirect evidence in that you can’t determine the answer to the question, “How old was Daniel Plant, of Sussex County, New Jersey, when he became employed by the L. & H. R. Railroad?” Other evidence must be combined with this article in order to answer that question.

There are also a few other articles found in local newspapers about Daniel and the railroad in the following years. We learn that in 1910 Daniel lost a finger on his right hand while working. He was still with the railroad but is now at the Lackawanna station in Branchville Junction, which may or may not be part of the L. & H. R. Railroad.[1]

In 1915, we learn that he had been promoted to baggage-master at the passenger depot in Newton and that he had succeeded John McKee who had resigned.[2]

CONCLUSION

These are great examples of what you can find in the newspapers about the social lives of family members. In the pre-Facebook era, this was one way for the people to keep in touch with what might be happening in their towns. Short, little snippets of your ancestor’s lives could be waiting for you to find in the local and neighborhood newspapers.


[1] Daniel Plant,” news article, Sussex Register, 14 April 1910, p. 5, col. 3; Bound newspaper stacks, Sussex County Historical Society, Newton, New Jersey.
[2] “Daniel Plant, of Andover,” employment announcement, Sussex Register, 23 September 1915; Bound newspaper stacks, Sussex County Historical Society, Newton, New Jersey.

Sunday’s Obituary – Carrie E. Strait – Died 31-March-1993

Relationship to me: indeterminate. I haven’t connected her husband Alonzo Strait to the family tree yet.

This obituary is in the vertical files, Strait folder, of the Sussex County Historical Society in Newton, New Jersey.

screen-shot-2016-11-17-at-7-06-36-pm“Carrie E. Strait, 91, worked at hospital” – Wharton – Carrie E. Strait died Wednesday at Dover General Hospital after a long illness. She was 91.

She was born in Netcong, where she lived until moving to Wharton 17 years ago.

Mrs. Strait worked in the laundry of Dover General Hospital of 35 years, retiring in 1989.

She was a member of the Dover General Hospital Auxiliary.

Her husband, Alonzo, died in 1964.

Survivors include two sons, Arnold of Oneida, N.Y., and George of Dover; two daughters, the Rev. Roberta Pacini of Philadelphia and Norma Smith of Wharton; seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Arrangements are by Bermingham Funeral Home, 249 S. Main St., Wharton.

 

52 Documents in 52 Weeks #48 – Susanna Williams’s 1860 Census

Person of Interest: Susanna Williams
Relationship: 4th great grandmother


Source Citation: 1860 U. S. census, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Jackson Township, p. 572 & 573 (stamped), dwelling 586, family 624 & 625, Susanna Williams; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 30 July 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication M653, roll 1142.


Document Description: These documents are part of the Eighth Census of the United States which was taken in 1860. It is the eighth census taken since 1790. The U.S. census counts every resident in the United States. It is mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution and takes place every 10 years. The U.S. Census Bureau is responsible for taking the censuses. After 72 years (and not before owing to privacy reasons), the records are released to the public by the National Archives and Records Administration.  The U.S. Census Bureau provides the interested researcher a great overview of each census. In the 1860 overview, we find that the 1850 Census Act was the authorizing legislation for the 1860 census. Which explains why the 1860 census looks very similar to the 1850 census. There is one new column which asks about the value of personal estate.

“That act had stipulated that, according to the recommendation of the secretary of the interior, its provisions were to be adhered to for all future decennial censuses if no new authorizing legislation was passed by January 1 of the year in which the census was required.”

James Buchanan (photo above, photo credit http://www.census.gov) was the president on the day of the census on 01 June 1860.

Both Ancestry.com (fee site) and FamilySearch.org (free) offers digitized copies of the census and are searchable by name. The History and Growth of the United States Census: 1790 – 1890 was a document prepared for the Senate Committee on the Census in 1900 and as written by Carroll D. Wright, the Commissioner of Labor, and William C. Hunt, Chief Statistician of the 12th census. If you’re into statistics or reading up on the historical background of the censuses, this is a great document to dig into.


Documents Scan/Transcription: Numbers relate to columns on the population schedule.

Page 572 Header
Schedule I. Free Inhabitants in Jackson Township in the County of Monroe, State of Pennsylvania enumerated by me, on the 12th day of July 1860. Sinford Marsh, Ass’t Marshal.

Page 572 Detail
lines 40-42, George Longcor, Hannah, and John [respectively with ; between]

Place of Abode
1. Dwelling number in order of visitation: 586
2. Family number in order of visitation: 624
3. The Name of every Person whose usual place of abode on the first day of Jun, 1860, was in this family: Susannah Williams

Description
4. Age: 52
5. Sex: F
6. Color: [blank]

Occupation
7. Profession, Occupation, or Trade of each Male Person over 15 years of age: [blank]

Value of Estate Owned
8. Value of Real Estate owned: [blank]
9. Value of Personal Estate: [blank]

Nativity
10. Place of Birth. Naming the State, Territory, or Country: Pennsylvania

Additional Information
11. Married within the year: [blank]
12. Attended School within the year: [blank]
13. Persons over 20 yrs of age who cannot read & write: [blank]
14. Whether deaf and dumb, blind, insane, idiotic, pauper, or convict: [blank]

Page 573 Header
Schedule I. Free Inhabitants in Jackson Township in the County of Monroe, State of Pennsylvania enumerated by me, on the 12th day of July 1860. Sinford Marsh, Ass’t Marshal.

Page 573 Detail
lines 1-7, Margaret, Christian, Samuel, Allen, Gabriel, Emanuel and Rachel Williams [respectively with ; between]

Place of Abode
1. Dwelling number in order of visitation: [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]
2. Family number in order of visitation: [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; 625; [blank]
3. The Name of every Person whose usual place of abode on the first day of Jun, 1850, was in this family: Margaret Williams; Christian —-; Samuel —-; Allen —-; Gabriel —-; Emanuel Williams; Rachel M. —-

Description
4. Age: 27; 19; 13; 9; 6; 30; 22
5. Sex: F; F; M; M; M; M; F
6. Color: [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]

Occupation
7. Profession, Occupation, or Trade of each Male Person over 15 years of age: [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; Laborer; [blank]

Value of Estate Owned
8. Value of Real Estate owned: [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]
9. Value of Personal Estate: [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; 20; [blank]

Nativity
10. Place of Birth. Naming the State, Territory, or Country: Pennsylvania; [ditto]; [ditto]; [ditto]; [ditto]; [ditto]; [ditto]

Additional Information
11. Married within the year: [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]
12. Attended School within the year: [blank]; [blank]; yes; yes; yes; [blank]; [blank]
13. Persons over 20 yrs of age who cannot read & write: [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]
14. Whether deaf and dumb, blind, insane, idiotic, pauper, or convict: [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]; [blank]


Analysis: The above listings/transcriptions are a bit hard to read, I admit it. So why go through the pain of typing it all out? It forced me to look at every single box and tick mark and code and notation. So, let’s put the above in a more user-friendly, narrative format:

On 01 June 1860, Susannah Williams (52) was living with a young female named Margaret (27), four young males named Christian (19), Samuel (13), Allen (9) and Gabriel (6) and another family unit, Emanuel Williams (30) and Rachel M. (22). The family was living in Jackson Township, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, when Sinford Marsh arrived to enumerator them on 12 July 1860. In order of visitation, the families were labeled as living in dwelling #586 and as families #624 and 625.

The only person in the household working was Emanuel who was listed as a laborer. All were listed as being born in Pennsylvania. Emanuel was listed as having $20 in personal estate value. The family was healthy in that nothing was filled in for the column for blindness, deaf and dumbness, idiocy, insanity, pauper, or convict. The census indicated that Samuel, Allen, and Gabriel were attending school. 

Note: Christian was incorrectly listed as a female in this census.

The 1860 census does not tells the viewer the specific relationships within the family group, so other evidence is needed to prove that Margaret, Christian, Samuel, Allen and Gabriel were Susannah’s children and that Emanuel and Rachel M. were husband and wife. However, the instructions to the enumerators directed that “the names are to be written beginning with the father and mother, or, if either or both be dead, begin with some other ostensible head of the family, to be followed, as far as practicable, with the name of the oldest child residing at home, then the next oldest, and so on to the youngest, then the other inmates, lodgers, and boarders, laborers, domestics, and servants.”

Nothing pops out as being odd with this family. However, it doesn’t hurt to go look at the enumerator instructions to see how things were to be reported. The IPUMS, which stands for the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series, website has a handy place to look up all enumerator instructions for the 1860 census.  Some of the instructions found there include:

  • Refusal to Answer.- If any person to whom application is made for information should refuse to give it, or should designedly make false representations, you should inform him of the responsibility he incurs thereby, and the penalty to which he becomes liable under the 15th section of the law.
  • By “dwelling house” is meant a separate tenement, inhabited or uninhabited, and may contain one or more families under one roof.
  • If a house is used partly for a store or other purpose and partly for a dwelling, it is to be numbered as a dwelling house.
  • A widow living alone and separately providing for herself, or two hundred individuals living together and provided for by a common head, should each be numbered as one family. [I suspect Susannah falls into this group.]
  • All landlords, jailors, superintendents of poor-houses, garrisons, hospitals, asylums, and other similar institutions, are to be considered as heads of their respective families, and the inmates under their care to be registered as members thereof, and the details concerning each, designated in their proper columns, so distinctly as to preclude any doubt as to who for the family proper and who the guests, prisoners, or other inmates, carefully omitting all transient persons.
  • Profession, Trade, and Occupation— Under head 7, entitled “Profession, occupation, or trade of each person over fifteen years of age,” insert the specific profession, occupation, or trade the individual being enumerated is reputed to follow.
  • Value of Personal Estate.– Under heading 9, insert (in dollars) the value of personal property or estate. Here you are to include the value of all the property, possessions, or wealth of each individual which is not embraced in the column previous, consist of what it may; the value of bonds, mortgages, notes, slaves, live stock, plate, jewels, or furniture; in fine, the value of whatever constitutes the personal wealth of individuals. Exact accuracy may not be arrived at, but all persons should be encouraged to give a near and prompt estimate for your information.

It pays to also examine the people around your person of interest. For example, Susannah’s son David Williams, his wife Margaret, and their children were listed in household 623, just above Susannah on the same census page. Always look at the page before and the page after your person of interest to see what friends, neighbors, and associates are around your person.

CONCLUSION

Widow Susannah Williams was living in the same house with her 30-year-old son Emanuel and his wife Rachel. The family was living in Jackson Township, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, next door to Susannah’s son David Williams. Most of her older children were in their own households by 1860 but children Margaret, Christian, Samuel, Allen and Gabriel were still living with her. This 1860 census adds to my research list in that a death record needs to be tracked down for Susannah’s husband Joseph and a marriage record for Emanuel and Rachel.

Sunday’s Obituary – David Hunt – Died 25-September-1870

Relationship to me: 1st cousin, 4x removed

The obituary was published in the Sussex Register, 06 October 1870. Found in the newspaper stacks at the Newton Historical Society. It’s a short and sweet death notice.

screen-shot-2016-11-17-at-7-00-33-pm

DIED – HUNT – In Andover (of typhoid fever) on the 25th ult., David L. Hunt, Esq., aged about 36 years.